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Harries Watkins Jones are a Bridgend and Pontypridd (South Wales) based firm of Chartered Accountants, tax and business advisers. They pride themselves in providing high levels of service. With each and every new client, they never assume their requirements but seek to tailor their services to their individual needs.Their goal is to build a strong and sustainable working business relationship with each client and to offer them real solutions to their business problems.

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Tuesday, 1 February 2011

February's Questions & Answers

Q. My husband inherited a house in 1986 when it was worth £40,000. He gave me a half share in the property in 2009 when it was worth £450,000. We sold the property in December 2010 for £460,000, but we never lived there. How do I calculate my share of the profit?

A. As you and your husband were living together during the tax year in which he gave you a half share in the property, that gift is deemed to be made at a value that creates no gain and no loss for your husband. Thus in 2009 he disposed of half the property to you at a value of £20,000, the tax cost of which was half the probate value: £20,000. Hence he makes no profit on his gift (£20,000 - £20,000 = nil). The market value of the property in 2009 is irrelevant. You acquire the half share in the property in 2009 at a deemed cost of £20,000.

When the property was sold in 2010 your share of the proceeds was £230,000 (£460,000/2) and the cost of your half share was £20,000. Your share of the profit (taxable gain) is £210,000 (£230,000 - £20,000). Your husband has also made a taxable gain on the sale of the property of £210,000. You can both deduct an annual exemption of £10,100 from your share of the gain, but the balance of the gain will be subject to capital gains tax.

Q. In January 2008 I formed C Ltd with my wife, we were both directors and held 50% of the shares each. In March 2010 we split up, her shares were transferred to me and she also resigned as a director. C Ltd ceased trading in July 2010, and it will be wound up informally. Can I claim entrepreneurs' relief on the whole of the capital distribution paid to me on the winding up, or will just part of the distribution qualify because I only held 100% of the shares for the last 4 months that C Ltd traded?

A. You qualify for entrepreneurs' relief on gains arising from all your shares in C Ltd, as you held at least 5% of the ordinary shares for 1 year up to the date the company ceased trading, and you were also a director of C Ltd throughout the last year of trading. Therefore any shares you held in C Ltd qualify for entrepreneurs' relief, and you will pay capital gains tax at 10% on the capital distribution (after deduction of your annual exemption of £10,100), rather than tax at 28% or 18%.

Q. I've heard that tax relief on childcare vouchers is changing from April 2011. How can I maximise the tax relief from this scheme while it lasts?

A. Employers can currently supply their employees with childcare vouchers worth up to £55 per week, which are completely free of tax and NI. However, employees who join the childcare voucher scheme from 6 April 2011 will only be able to receive vouchers worth £28 per week, if they pay tax at the 40% rate. Those employees in the childcare voucher scheme before 6 April 2011 will not have the value of their vouchers limited, and neither will employees taxed at the basic rate of 20%.

To gain maximum advantage from the scheme you need to bring into your childcare voucher scheme as many employees as qualify before 6 April 2011. Unfortunately employees who are not yet parents, or do not have parental responsibility for a child aged under 16, do not qualify to join the childcare voucher scheme. The childcare vouchers can only be used to pay for childcare provided by a registered or approved childcarer. 



If you have any tax questions you would like answered please email neil.harries@harrieswatkins.com or visit the Accountants Bridgend website. 

Disclaimer
The information contained in this article is of a general nature and no assurance of accuracy can be given. It is not a substitute for specific professional advice in your own circumstances. No action should be taken without consulting the detailed legislation or seeking professional advice. Therefore no responsibility for loss occasioned by any person acting or refraining from action as a consequence of the material can be accepted by the authors or the firm.

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