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Harries Watkins Jones are a Bridgend and Pontypridd (South Wales) based firm of Chartered Accountants, tax and business advisers. They pride themselves in providing high levels of service. With each and every new client, they never assume their requirements but seek to tailor their services to their individual needs.Their goal is to build a strong and sustainable working business relationship with each client and to offer them real solutions to their business problems.

To find out more please visit their website.

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Thursday, 3 April 2014

Real Time Information (RTI) Penalties

Image courtesy of Renjith Krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
HMRC has experienced significant problems in reconciling amounts of PAYE due from employers, to the amounts reported under real time information (RTI). As a result some of the automatic RTI penalties which were to apply from 6 April 2014, will now apply from:
  • October 2014 for late filing of in-year RTI reports; and
  • April 2015 for late payment of in-year PAYE due.
However, interest for late paid PAYE will still apply from 6 April 2014. To keep on top of what PAYE you have paid and what HMRC thinks is due, you should view the business tax dashboard facility on the HMRC website at regular intervals. Unfortunately we cannot access the business tax dashboard on your behalf.

Thursday, 20 March 2014

2014 Budget News

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
This was a Budget for bingo-playing baby-boomers who have not started to draw their private pensions. George Osborne announced some sweeping reforms to the taxation of pensions and halved bingo duty.
The traditional "sin taxes" on booze and fuel have largely been frozen or even reduced, although tobacco suffers a 2% above inflation tax rise. The new "sins" appear to be; owning a valuable home through a company and operating a high-stakes gaming machine.

Most individuals aged under 67 will feel the benefit of an increase in personal allowance from £10,000 to £10,500 in 2015. A transferable married couples' allowance of £1,050 will also help basic rate taxpayers from April 2015. Savers will enjoy higher tax-free limits for ISAs and premium bonds later this year, plus a cut in tax on savings income from 2015.

Businesses are encouraged to invest in equipment by an increase in the annual investment allowance to £500,000 from April 2014, and reliefs for investing in small trading companies and social enterprises are enhanced. Small and medium sized companies who undertake R&D are also given additional tax relief.

Wednesday, 12 March 2014

CGT on Home Developments

Image courtesy of Simon Howden / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Your main home is exempt from capital gains tax when you sell it, but only if you bought the property with the intention of living in it on a permanent basis, not as a project to renovate and sell. People who are required to live in job related accommodation, such as prison warders and church ministers, can have a separate tax-exempt home without having to live in it.

Some taxpayers who have taken on renovation projects have found the gain on their property doesn't qualify for the tax exemption, because they can't prove they occupied the property on a permanent basis while it was being renovated before the sale.

For example, Jason Moore bought a property with his girlfriend in December 1999. He claimed to have lived there while he renovated it in the period to late February 2000, when he returned to live with his girlfriend. The property was then let to tenants until it was sold for a profit in June 2004. Jason had no documentary evidence of his time at the property in the three months to February 2000, so his claim for the tax exemption failed.

Friday, 7 February 2014

Disguised Employment

Image courtesy of Chanpipat/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net 
The Government is cracking down on situations in which workers are treated as self-employed for tax purposes, and hence pay low amounts of NICs, but from the outside they appear to act as employees. The following changes in the tax law are proposed to block the use of 'self-employed' workers working through LLPs or who are hired-out through employment agencies.

LLPs

All individual members of LLPs are currently taxed as self-employed persons, even if they receive a regular 'salary'. This is the default position of the law and nothing is being 'fiddled' to put workers in this position. However, HMRC believe this rule is being abused, and the workers involved may not realise that they are technically self-employed.

Wednesday, 13 March 2013

Self-Employed Travel Expenses

If you are self-employed you may have a number of customers you go to regularly to work at their premises. This could apply to mobile hairdressers, cleaners, gardeners, and even medical professionals who work at private clinics. The miles you drive to reach each of your customers from your business base are used to calculate the amount of travel expenses you claim in your business accounts.

This is all good, but the Taxman has recently argued in a tax case that where the business is based at the person's home, that home-office can't be treated as the starting point for travel when the work is performed almost entirely at customers' properties. The Taxman has particularly challenged travel expenses claimed by doctors who work at private clinics and do not see patients at their home-office. The Taxman has tried to ignore the necessary preparation and report writing work the doctor has to perform at his home-office.

Thursday, 28 February 2013

Annual Payroll and RTI

Under real time information (RTI) PAYE reporting, a Full Payment Submission (FPS) report is required to be made to HMRC every time an employee is paid, not just once after the end of the tax year as is currently the case. RTI will be compulsory for most employers from the first pay date following 6 April 2013.

Many one-person companies may wish to pay the director just once a year and avoid monthly RTI reporting. If you want to do this, you must first check that your payroll software will cope with an annual payroll, as many main-stream payroll software packages do not.

The second stage is to understand what reports HMRC will require under RTI. An annual payroll must be registered with HMRC. The current advice on the HMRC website says: "If all payments on which tax and NICs are due are paid to your employees annually in a single tax month, you can ask HMRC to be treated as an 'annual payer'. You must use the same month every year, so if this changes or you start paying your employees more frequently, you will need to tell HMRC."

Saturday, 2 February 2013

Letting Relief Explained

If you have let a property which was once your main home, or was treated as your main home as you lived in job related accommodation, letting relief can help reduce the tax you pay on the eventual sale. This tax relief cannot apply to a buy-to-let property that has never been occupied by the owner.

The property must be let as residential accommodation, not as office space, or operated as a trade such as bed and breakfast. If only part of the property is let, that let part must not form a self-contained annexe such as a granny flat.

The tax relief for letting is given in addition to exemption from tax for gains arising in respect of any periods when you occupied the property as your main home. This exemption is also extended to cover the gain arising in respect of the last 36 months of ownership.

Tuesday, 25 September 2012

Gifting Assets or Shares

If you plan to gift assets or shares to your relatives, there are several taxes you need to consider:

Capital Gains Tax

You won't make an actual profit or gain when you give away assets or shares, so you may not expect to pay capital gains tax. However, when the gift is made to a person connected to you, such as your son or daughter, UK tax law deems you to have made a transfer of the asset at its market value. This means you could well make a paper gain on the gift, which will be subject to capital gains tax. This does not apply to a gift to your spouse or civil partner.

You need to calculate this gain to see if it needs to be reported on your tax return. Where the gain from the gift, together with any other gains you make in the year, exceeds your annual exemption of £10,600, all those gains must be reported on your tax return.

Monday, 17 September 2012

Whose Fault is Underpaid Tax?

Have you received a tax calculation (on form P800) which shows you owe tax that you thought had been collected under PAYE? Every year the Tax Office undertakes a 'PAYE reconciliation' to check whether the tax collected from pensions and salary under PAYE was the correct amount. Where a taxpayer has a number of jobs or several pensions in a year, the PAYE system can get it wrong, leaving tax underpaid.

We can help you check any form P800 you receive, but we need to see the PAYE codes issued to you for the tax year, and payslips from your employer or pension provider to check what PAYE codes they have used. Where the employer/pension provider has not used the correct PAYE code and this causes any tax not to be collected, it remains their responsibility, not yours.

Tuesday, 11 September 2012

VAT Self-billing

'Self-billing' is where the customer in the supplier/customer relationship raises the invoices to themselves for work done or goods provided by the supplier, instead of the supplier raising those invoices. Self-billing helps large organisations that need to pay out lots of small amounts to hundreds of suppliers. It allows their purchase invoices to be standardised which saves costs when processing, and payments to be made automatically at the time the invoice is raised.

However, there are significant disadvantages for the supplier who agrees to self-billing. The supplier losses control of when invoices are raised and may have no control over the amount billed and the amount of VAT shown on the invoice.

Although the VATman's guidance on their website says that the recipient of the supply (i.e. the customer who raises the self-billed invoice) is responsible for ensuring the invoice carries the correct VAT amount, it is actually the supplier who remains responsible for the amount of VAT charged.